Posted

TAKEAWAYS:

  • The European Union Court of Justice (“CJEU”) to rule on the validity of Model Contractual Clauses (“MCCs”) following referral by the Irish High Court.
  • The Irish High Court has “well-founded” concerns that there is no effective remedy in US law for EU citizens whose personal data is transferred to the United States and the use of MCCs does not eliminate those concerns.

Posted

Tim Wright, Partner and Antony Bott, Special Counsel, in Pillsbury’s Global Sourcing & Technology Transactions Practice look at some of the issues to be considered when procuring and sourcing robotic process automation software and solutions

The Future Is Now

You can’t move in the outsourcing industry without hearing about Robotic Process Automation (RPA). And while it might sound like terminology cribbed from a sci-fi novel, the truth is that RPA is already here, and it is transforming the way modern businesses operate. Along with related developments in machine learning and artificial intelligence, automation as a whole has been characterised by the former chief scientist of Baidu as being “as transformative for society as electricity.” Fuelled by continuing developments in computing power, big data, storage and connectivity, the opportunity for companies is to save money, while operating more effectively, scalably and compliantly—it is, in many senses, a compelling opportunity.

Posted

Industry 4.0

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is the term coined by Klaus Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, to describe the fourth major industrial era since the first industrial revolution which took place in Europe and America in the 18th and 19th centuries. Industry 4.0 comprises a collection of transformative technologies, what Schwab refers to as “emerging technology breakthroughs,” such as automation, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, digitalisation, use of composite materials, autonomous vehicles, quantum computing and nanotechnology with industrial/commercial applications.

Although not a new technology, many commentators would include additive manufacturing (AM) in the list of transformative technologies making up Industry 4.0. Until relatively recently, however, AM’s adoption was largely confined to development of prototypes with industrial uses rather than full scale manufacturing. This started to change with the expiration of certain key patents around a decade or so ago, to the point that today – although still in its infancy – AM has reached an inflection point as lower costs and technical advances have put it in reach of a greater number of businesses and consumers.

Posted

Those of us who have been grappling with how best to approach GDPR compliance in outsourcing and other commercial contracts will be all too familiar with Article 28 of the GDPR. Article 28.3 builds on the limited obligations that existed under the existing regime but also include some significant enhancements to the minimum processor obligations to be addressed head on in the contract.

Processor’s obligation to notify infringing instructions

One requirement of Article 28.3 in particular, has provided clients and counsel alike with a degree of angst since the final draft of the GDPR was published in May 2016, and further back still for those of us who had followed the negotiations and multiple redrafts of the GDPR prior to its final publication.

Posted

Global In-House Centers (GICs) were first seen in India in the 1990s as an alternative to IT outsourcing arrangements with third-party vendors. The principal driver was labor-cost arbitrage between the United States or Europe and India. The banking, financial services and insurance industries were early adopters. In their original iteration, GICs were known as “offshore captive centers.” A number of these captives were later sold to outsourcing vendors, particularly in the years following the Great Recession.

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in GICs in India across a wider range of industries, including transportation, telecom, media, manufacturing, medical devices, oil & gas, aerospace, retail and hospitality. In “Global In-House Centers in India, v2.0,” Pillsbury partners Jeff Hutchings  and Craig de Ridder explore how GICs in India are evolving from cost-saving platforms into Innovation Centers for emerging digital technologies that can provide a competitive advantage.

Posted

The increasing number of software supply chain compromises represents a significant weakness that should be top of mind for security professionals. Regardless of your firm’s core business, chances are they rely on and are connected to a range of software provider’s electronic distribution channels for acquiring initial licenses or software updates. Any such electronic access, even through authorized and vetted means, poses a risk to the organization. Put simply: your software provider’s vulnerabilities could easily become your next breach.

In “Software Distribution Compromise Tactics,” a blog post on FireEye, Pillsbury counsel Meighan O’Reardon discusses how to limit the risk of exposure to your organization.

 

Posted

Toll-free telephone numbers celebrated their 50th birthday this year (frankly, without much fanfare). These numbers allow callers to reach businesses without being charged for the call. When long distance calling was expensive, these numbers were enticing marketing tools used by businesses to encourage customer calls and provide a single number for nationwide customer service—for example, hotel, airline or car rental reservations.

Toll-free numbers are most valuable to businesses when they are easy to remember because they spell a word (1-877-DENTIST) or have a simple dialing pattern (1-855-222-2222). Like all telephone numbers, however, the FCC considers toll-free numbers to be a public resource, not owned by any single person, business or telephone company. Toll-free numbers are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis, primarily by telecommunications carriers known as Responsible Organizations. The FCC even has rules that prohibit hoarding (keeping more than you need) or selling toll-free numbers.

But the rules will change if the FCC adopts its recent proposal to assign toll-free numbers by auction as it prepares to open access to its new “833” toll-free numbers. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking issued last week proposes to auction off approximately 17,000 toll-free numbers for which there have been competing requests. The proceeds of these auctions would then be used to reduce the costs of administering toll-free numbers.

Posted

Imagine dialing 911 and hearing an automated voice tell you that what you have dialed is not a valid number; or reaching a 911 call center only to have emergency personnel dispatched to the wrong location. In response to such problems, the FCC yesterday released a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) asking a broad range of questions about the capability of enterprise-based communications systems (ECS)—internal phone systems used in places like office buildings, campuses and hotels—to provide access for 911 calls.

According to the FCC, certain of these systems may not support direct 911 dialing, may not have the capability to route calls to the appropriate 911 call center, or may not provide accurate information on the caller’s location. The NOI seeks public comment on consumer expectations regarding the ability to access 911 call centers when calling from an ECS, and seeks ways, including regulation if needed, to improve the capabilities of ECS to provide direct access for 911 calls.

The FCC generally requires telephone service providers to offer enhanced 911 service, which basically means that the provider will forward the caller’s telephone number and registered location to the appropriate public safety answering point (PSAP), which should be the 911 call center closest to the caller. Call takers at the PSAP are then responsible for dispatching the appropriate emergency responder—police, fire or ambulance.

Posted

The UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (‘FCA’) has now announced the participants in the second cohort of its regulatory sandbox, with the companies involved offering a range of ideas-based payment services and artificial intelligence software. In “The FCA Announces The Second Cohort For Its Regulatory Sandbox“, an article in Payments & FinTech Lawyer, Pillsbury partner Tim Wright provides an overview of the second cohort and their characteristics.

 

Posted

The UK Government has published a statement of intent containing details of its proposed Data Protection Bill. The full text of the Bill is expected in September 2017, when the UK Parliament returns from its summer break.

The Bill will enshrine the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) into UK domestic law. It will also implement the requirements of EU Directive 2016/680 (The Law Enforcement Directive) which covers the processing of personal data for crime prevention, and the free movement of such data.

Why is a UK bill needed?